Ali Roseberry-Polier

School: Swarthmore College
Location: Swarthmore, PA

Ali Roseberry-Polier's Posts

This post originally appreared at Waging Nonviolence. To read the original post, click here.

Anti-mountaintop removal activist Larry Gibson, who passed away last year, saw most of his family's land on Kayford Mountain in West Virginia razed by the coal industry. (Flickr / Blaine O'Neill)

Anti-mountaintop removal activist Larry Gibson, who passed away last year, saw most of his family’s land on Kayford Mountain in West Virginia razed by the coal industry. (Flickr / Blaine O’Neill)

Two and a half years ago, I arrived home from the last of several trips to West Virginia, where I had gone with a group of 10 fellow Swarthmore College students to witness the impacts of mountaintop removal coal mining. Knowing that our school was invested in this practice that is decimating rural communities — and wanting to support their organizing against it — we decided to ask Swarthmore to divest its stock holdings from fossil fuels. Although we knew that our school wouldn’t have a huge impact on the situation, we hoped our actions would encourage other schools to start similar campaigns — thereby drawing more attention to the daily struggles of people on the frontlines of fossil fuel extraction, and possibly even posing a threat to the industry itself.

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This post originally appeared on Waging Nonviolence. To see the original post, click here

A map showing where each of the Global Power Shift participants were from. (Flickr / Jim Dougherty)

A map showing where each of the Global Power Shift participants were from. (Flickr / Jim Dougherty)

When I arrived in Istanbul two weeks ago for Global Power Shift — an unprecedented gathering of 500 young climate activists from around the world — I was excited about the possibility of building global solidarity and an international climate justice movement. After all, I was about to meet people working on a wide range of climate-related issues. What I didn’t anticipate, however, was how that translated into vastly different organizing styles — not to mention different understandings of what “climate” even means.

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