solar

Want to help raise awareness about solar energy on your campus?

The first week of February is Solar Education Week!

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February 1-7 join a national movement to amplify solar knowledge on campuses across the country! From coast to coast students at universities around the country are hosting solar education events the first week of February to spark a national conversation about solar energy.  Does your campus have a solar education event planned yet?  Check on the list at www.re-volv.org/solaredweek and if not, sign up to host one!

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I wanted to share what a local nonprofit in San Francisco is doing and how we can all support it!

RE-volv is a nonprofit that crowdfunds to finance solar installations for nonprofits and cooperatives that serve as community centers.  Using a lease-to-own model, monthly payments from community centers (still less than their original energy bill) are reinvested to finance more solar energy projects.  Each individual project will yield 3-5 additional projects - a revolving fund for solar energy and a model that pays your donation forward!

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All good things must come to an end, and the Community Organizing grant from Grand Aspirations is no exception. But to quote another piece of folk wisdom, as one thing ends another begins, and that Soulardarity is very nearly prepared to launch into a fundraising campaign for a community-owned city-wide infrastructure project (and, hopefully, pay salaries) is evidence of this statement’s truth.

Brandon Knight, discussing a potential solar investment opportunity with these chickens

Brandon Knight, discussing a potential solar investment opportunity with these chickens

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How do we get to 100% clean energy? At Mosaic, we believe the fastest way is to allow more people to participate in building the clean energy economy.

In the video above, produced by Mosaic’s good friends at Green For All, we lay out our vision for a future of abundant clean energy, for and by the people.

Until recently, there were good reasons why almost all of us were energy consumers, rather than energy producers. We didn’t have good alternatives to fossil fuels and so we were hamstrung: concerned about the environment, our communities, and our children's futures, but unable to do much more than change our light bulbs. We had little choice but to rely on a system in which only the biggest players—those who could blow the top off of a mountain or finance a billion dollar power plant—could profit from the world’s biggest industry.

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Yesterday’s State of the Union address could go down as a watershed moment in America’s transition to a clean energy economy. Two years ago, the president wouldn’t mention climate change. Last night, he spoke honestly about the issue to 40 million people and vowed that if “Congress won’t act soon to protect future generations, I will.” The question is: Just what can President Obama do, and what will it mean for our economy and energy system?

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Two years ago at Power Shift 2011, Energy Action Coalition co-founder Billy Parish unveiled a revolutionary new idea:

What if thousands of us, as a movement, could pool small amounts of money to turn solar projects in our communities into crowd-funded realities?

Today, Billy’s new platform Mosaic, a “Kickstarter for Solar” is launching and making it easy to do just that; now everyday people like you and me can invest directly in renewable energy. If you live in New York or California, or if you’re an “accredited investor” in other states, you can log-in, pick a solar project that you like, make an investment for as little as $25, and get returns starting at 4.5% annually.

It may sound crazy, but it’s for real. For the first time ever, people like you and me can invest directly in solar projects and earn real returns. No longer do we need to wait on banks and politicians to make renewable energy a reality; we can do it ourselves!

Here’s how it works: Mosaic connects small investors to solar projects that need some investment. The projects generate revenue by selling the electricity they generate, which allows the investors to get paid back with interest.

Let’s put our money where our mouth is: Join the Solar Money Bomb by investing $25 in a community solar project!

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In search of local solutions to climate change, S4S Team India weaved its way trough Laxmikantapur, a small village in West Bengal. People in this village depend heavily on agriculture for their livelihoods. The village remains to be electrified by the government of India, and the majority of villagers have traditionally been using kerosene for lighting, as well as cooking, a practice that can prove hazardous to human health. But, this is quickly changing. With the help of grassroots organizations like Onergy, many people in Laxmikantapur have already benefited from switching to solar. ‘Surviving with Solar’ explores rural life in Laxmikantapur, and how solar energy has improved the lives and incomes of its inhabitants. With over 80,000 villages in India yet to be electrified, the film elucidates how off-grid, small scale solar energy is an eco-friendly solution for survival.

This blog was cross-posted from www.projectsurvivalmedia.org and written by Ritu Bhardwaj.

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St. Petersburg, Florida – Over 50 people held a rally at the Progress Energy Building to protest the proposed charges to ratepayers for new nuclear power generation this past Saturday, October 1. The protests called on the Public Service Commission (PSC) to reject the utility’s current request to charge customers up-front for new reactor costs, stop supporting the dying and polluting nuclear industry, and instead to support solar in the Sunshine State. The PSC is currently considering millions of dollars in bill increases for the proposed new nuclear reactors at Progress Energy’s proposed Levy County site and FPL’s Turkey Point nuclear plant, a disastrous move that would jeopardize the safety of the state and put a financial burden on Florida ratepayers.

At the rally, Florida youth from the Florida Youth Environmental Sustainability Coalition (FL YES) and concerned citizens from the Coalition Against Nukes (C.A.N.) participated in a “People’s Hearing” to demand that the Public Service Commission work for people, not polluters, and stop nuclear cost recovery. Because the PSC did not allow for public comment on this very public issue during hearings held in August, Floridians chose to take it into their own hands, and provided a space for the public to comment on their concerns with nuclear cost recovery.

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